Heavy metal contamination from makeup - FOX 10 News | myfoxphoenix.com

Heavy metal contamination from makeup

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Sheila McCaffrey sits for a few hours hooked up to an IV once a week. She's getting chelation therapy, which helps remove toxic heavy metals from the body. Sheila has been diagnosed with high levels of lead, aluminum, and mercury. She believes the main culprit has been her favorite beauty products.

Sheila's physician, Dr. John Salerno, says makeup companies aren't required to list contaminants on labels. He says these contaminants can affect the nervous system and trigger fatigue, headaches, and problems with reproduction

So you might be thinking, 'I don't use that much make up and how worried do I have to be?' Experts say the average woman absorbs 5 pounds of make up in to her skin every year. Dr. Salerno says the skin absorbs these metals, which accumulate over time.

Patients like Sheila are now resorting to chelation. The FDA approved treatment occurs over the course of 10 $250 sessions. Patients get a mixture of vitamins, including calcium EDTA, which binds to the heavy metals and flushes them out.

Sheila says the first treatment left her feeling flu-like. But now she has swapped out all of her makeup for led-free products, watches what she eats and feels better.

Dr. Salerno says routine testing of heavy metals is critical.

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