House GOP Leaders Seek Short-Term Debt Extension - FOX 10 News | myfoxphoenix.com

House GOP Leaders Seek Short-Term Debt Extension

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Washington, D.C. -

(FOX 11 / AP) House Speaker John Boehner told Republican lawmakers Thursday he will give President Barack Obama a proposal extending the government's ability to borrow money through Nov. 22 - but only if he agrees to negotiate over ending the partial government shutdown and a longer-term increase in the debt ceiling.

"It gets us down the road a little bit so they can continue to talk," Rep. Tim Griffin, R-Ark., said after Boehner presented the plan to a closed-door meeting of House Republicans.

Though the GOP proposal could avert an unprecedented federal default that the Obama administration has warned could occur as early as Oct. 17, it would not necessarily bring a quick end to the 10-day partial federal shutdown. Obama has insisted that Congress reopen the government without condition.

A White House official said Obama would be willing to negotiate over the budget "once Republicans in Congress act to remove the threat of default and end this harmful government shutdown."

Boehner and other House GOP leaders were traveling to the White House later Thursday to discuss their budget battle with Obama.

Rep. Vern Buchanan, R-Fla., said the plan was for the House to approve the bill on Friday.

Details of the plan were confirmed by Griffin and described by aides who spoke only on condition of anonymity.

Obama has said he would sign a short-term extension, but not if it contained other language that he opposes, and wants Congress to send him a bill unconditionally ending the partial government shutdown as well. Republicans have said they want deficit reduction and cuts in government programs, including Obama's 2010 health care law, to be included.

Earlier Thursday, Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew warned the Senate Finance Committee that failure to renew the government's ability to borrow money "could be deeply damaging" to financial markets and threaten Americans' jobs and savings. It would also leave the government unsure of when it could make payments ranging from food aid to Medicare reimbursements to doctors, he said.

"The United States should not be put in a position of making such perilous choices for our economy and our citizens," the secretary said. "There is no way of knowing the irrevocable damage such an approach would have on our economy and financial markets."

The game of Washington chicken over increasing the debt limit - required so Treasury can borrow more money to pay the government's bills in full and on time - already has sent the stock market south, spiked the interest rate for one-month Treasury bills and prompted Fidelity Investments, the nation's largest manager of money market mutual funds, to sell federal debt that comes due around the time the nation could hit its borrowing limit.

At the Finance committee hearing, Lew met a buzzsaw of incredulity from Republicans, who said the bigger problem was the soaring costs of benefit programs like Social Security and Medicare and the long-term budget deficits the country faces. Many expressed doubt about Lew's description of the consequences of default.

The senior Republican on the panel, Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah, accused the Obama administration of "an apparent effort to whip up uncertainty in the markets." And veteran Sen. Mike Enzi, R-Wyoming, said, "I think this is 11th time I've been through this discussion about the sky is falling and the earth will erupt. Wyoming families aren't buying these arguments."

Replied Lew, "After they run up their credit card, they don't get to ignore it."

Lew also rejected GOP suggestions that in the event federal borrowing authority expires, the government could use the dwindling cash it has to make payments to debt holders and other high priority needs. He said federal payment systems are not designed to prioritize and said he didn't believe such an approach was technically possible.

"I think prioritization is just a default by another name," Lew said.

He also fended off attempts by the top Republican on the committee, Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah, and other GOP senators to learn how long a debt limit extension the president would like to see.

"Our view is this economy would benefit from more certainty and less brinksmanship. So the longer the period of time is, the better for the economy," said Lew, who also repeated Obama's willingness to accept a short-term extension for now.

Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus, D-Mont., said GOP demands to curb Obama's 2010 health care law as the price for ending the shutdown "is not up for debate" and would not happen.

"We need to reopen the government and pay the nation's bills, no strings attached," said Baucus.

Wednesday featured lots of activity but no progress toward ending the budget and debt limit impasses.

Obama had House Democrats over to the White House, while Republican conservatives heard a pitch from the House Budget Committee chairman, Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., on his plan to extend the U.S. borrowing cap for four to six weeks while jump-starting talks on a broader budget deal that could replace cuts to defense and domestic agency budgets with cuts to benefit programs like Medicare and reforms to the loophole-cluttered tax code. Curbs to "Obamacare" were not mentioned.

At the White House, Obama told House Democratic loyalists that he still would prefer a long-term increase in the nation's $16.7 trillion borrowing cap but said he's willing to sign a short-term increase to "give Boehner some time to deal with the tea party wing of his party," said Rep. Peter Welch, D-Vt.

A midday meeting Wednesday between the two top House Republicans and Democrats, meanwhile, yielded no progress.

Obama also invited the entire House GOP to the White House on Thursday but Boehner opted to send a smaller squadron of about 20 mostly senior members

The frustrating standoff in Washington is weighing down each side's poll numbers, but Republicans are taking the worst drubbing. A Gallup poll put the approval rating for the Republican Party at a record-low 28 percent. Polls have consistently said the Republicans deserve the greater share of blame for the shutdown.

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