Victim speaks out after judge rules MCSO racially profiled durin - FOX 10 News | myfoxphoenix.com

Victim speaks out after judge rules MCSO racially profiled during stops

Updated:
Dan Magos Dan Magos
PHOENIX -

A man who testified against MCSO in a racial profiling trial says he feels free Saturday.

A federal judge ruled the Maricopa County Sheriff's office was racially profiling Latinos on Friday.

The man FOX 10 spoke with Saturday is a 67-year-old US citizen who says he was a victim of racial profiling by MCSO.

He was one of five people who testified in the trial, telling a judge about a 2009 traffic stop where he says he lost all respect for the Sheriff and his deputies.

"Feel a little bit more free, you know," said Dan Magos.

Magos says he is grateful for Friday's ruling, where a federal judge found MCSO was racially profiling Latinos, relying on race when pulling over during immigration enforcement.

"Joe Arpaio was after the brown people of Arizona, that's what it amounted to," said Magos.

During the trial, Magos testified about his 2009 traffic stop, where he was pulled over by deputies and frisked.

"He said the reason for the stop was the license plate on my truck was not visible...and asked for documentation from me and my wife," said Magos. "He was always yelling and screaming at the top of his voice, never treated us in a decent manner."

Magos has been a US citizen for 45 years and his wife was born in the US.

"I had landscaping tools, rakes, hoes, shovels, even a wheelbarrow, and I think that's what triggered the stop," said Magos.

No citation was issued and the deputy let Magos go.

"At the end of the stop, he said I hope you don't think that this is anything to do with racial profiling and I said, 'That's exactly what it is'," said Magos.

"The MCSO's position is, and has always been, that it does not and has never used race against any particular group in the community; it never will use race," said Tim Casey, an attorney for Sheriff Arpaio and MCSO.

The sheriff's office blames the ruling on Immigration and Customs Enforcement, saying the agency trained deputies to use race as a factor to determine if a person was in the country illegally.

"It'll take a long time before I learn to respect them again, the Sheriff and deputies," said Magos. "I lost all respect in 2009."

We contacted ICE for comment, but have not heard back.

The Sheriff will not face jail time or fines as a result of the ruling.

Casey says they plan to appeal the ruling.

Both parties meet with the judge in June to talk about how to make changes.

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