TSA to remove controversial X-ray scanners - FOX 10 News | myfoxphoenix.com

TSA to remove controversial X-ray scanners

Posted: Updated:

By JOSHUA FREED | AP Business Writer

Those airport scanners with their all-too revealing body images will soon be going away.

The Transportation Security Administration says the X-ray scanners will be gone by June because the company that makes them can't fix the privacy issues. The other airport body scanners, which produce a generic outline instead of a naked image, are staying.

The government rapidly stepped up its use of body scanners after a man snuck explosives onto a flight bound for Detroit on Christmas day in 2009.

At first, both types of scanners showed travelers naked. The idea was that security workers could spot both metallic objects like guns as well as non-metallic items such as plastic explosives. They also showed every other detail of the passenger's body, too.

The TSA defended the scanners, saying the images couldn't be stored and were seen only by a security worker who didn't interact with the passenger. But the scans still raised privacy concerns. Congress ordered that the scanners either produce a more generic image or be removed by June.

On Thursday Rapiscan, the maker of the X-ray scanner, acknowledged that it wouldn't be able to meet the June deadline. The TSA said Friday that it ended its contract with Rapiscan.

The agency's statement also said the remaining scanners will move travelers through more quickly, meaning faster lanes at the airport. Those scanners, made by L-3 Communications, used millimeter waves to make an image. The company was able to come up with software that no longer produced a naked image of a traveler's body.

Rapiscan parent company OSI Systems Inc. said it will help the TSA move the scanners to other undisclosed government agencies. Scanners are often used in prisons or on military bases where privacy is not a concern.

OSI said it will maintain a scanner contract with the TSA, but would take a one-time charge of $2.7 million.

The contract to change the software on the scanners came under scrutiny in November when the TSA delivered a "show cause" letter to the company looking into allegations that it falsified test data, which the company denied. On Thursday it said final resolution of that issue needs approval by the Department of Homeland Security.

The agreement with the TSA is an indication that OSI Systems will be cleared of the issues raised by the agency, Roth Capital Partners analyst Jeff Martin wrote on Friday. OSI shares jumped $2.79, or 4.1 percent, to $70.44.

Besides the scanners being dropped by TSA, Hawthorne, Calif.-based OSI Systems makes other passenger scanners used in other countries, as well as luggage scanners and medical scanners.

  • Your MoneyMore>>

  • Future of money

    Future of money

    Wednesday, April 16 2014 10:36 PM EDT2014-04-17 02:36:39 GMT
    These days, when you check out of a grocery store, your toughest choice might be cash or credit.  But in a few years, there may be no need to carry dollar bills, credit cards, or stacks of cash.  It might sound like the stuff of science fiction but futurist and social scientist Heather Schlegel says it's not.
    These days, when you check out of a grocery store, your toughest choice might be cash or credit.  But in a few years, there may be no need to carry dollar bills, credit cards, or stacks of cash.  It might sound like the stuff of science fiction but futurist and social scientist Heather Schlegel says it's not.
  • IRS considers taxing work freebies like food

    IRS considers taxing work freebies like food

    Wednesday, April 16 2014 9:11 PM EDT2014-04-17 01:11:44 GMT
    In competitive job markets like Silicon Valley, companies are doing everything they can to entice the best and brightest -- offering freebies that have become the stuff of legend.Employee perks like free food at lavish cafeterias, laundry and even yoga are not unheard of.  But the taxman could soon crack down.  The IRS reportedly is looking at these perks and seeing if these companies need to start paying up for the free stuff they offer employees.
    In competitive job markets like Silicon Valley, companies are doing everything they can to entice the best and brightest -- offering freebies that have become the stuff of legend.Employee perks like free food at lavish cafeterias, laundry and even yoga are not unheard of.  But the taxman could soon crack down.  The IRS reportedly is looking at these perks and seeing if these companies need to start paying up for the free stuff they offer employees.
  • Social streaming video from your iPhone with YEVVO

    Social streaming video from your iPhone with YEVVO

    Wednesday, April 16 2014 8:46 AM EDT2014-04-16 12:46:01 GMT
    We met YEVVO's 26-year-old co-founder and CEO, Ben Rubin, on a rainy day in Madison Square Park. Among the four of us (Ben, me, my photographer, and the representative from Ben's PR firm), we had four smartphones and the free app Rubin created."What if you were going live during this interview and then somebody [online] started asking questions and then [that somebody] actually helped to create the content?" Rubin asked.
    We met YEVVO's 26-year-old co-founder and CEO, Ben Rubin, on a rainy day in Madison Square Park. Among the four of us (Ben, me, my photographer, and the representative from Ben's PR firm), we had four smartphones and the free app Rubin created."What if you were going live during this interview and then somebody [online] started asking questions and then [that somebody] actually helped to create the content?" Rubin asked.
Powered by WorldNow

KSAZ-TV & KUTP
511 W. Adams St.
Phoenix, AZ 85003

Phone: (602) 257-1234
Fax: (602) 262-0177

Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices